NORTHUMBERLAND 2014

 

 

 

All We Do and All We See Is All Our Lives Will Ever Be.

 

 

 

 

 

To View  Different Pages On This Web Site Use the menu Above On Each Page

 

 

To view images of Northumbria scroll down

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The remains of the old Lindisfarne Priory on Holy Island

 

 

 

The Holy Island of Lindisfarne is a tidal island off the northeast coast of England. It is also known just as Holy Island. It constitutes the civil parish of Holy Island in Northumberland.[2] Holy Island has a recorded history from the 6th century. It was an important centre of Celtic Christianity under Saints Aidan, Cuthbert, Eadfrith and Eadberht. After Viking invasions and the Norman conquest of England a priory was reestablished. A small castle was built upon it in 1550.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Above and below

 

 

 

 

Lindisfarne Castle is a 16th-century castle located on Holy Island, near Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England, much altered by Sir Edwin Lutyens in 1901. The island is accessible from the mainland at low tide by means of a causeway.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above and below.

The causeway.

Warning signs urge visitors walking to the island to keep to the marked path, check tide times and weather carefully, and to seek local advice if in doubt. For drivers, tide tables are prominently displayed at both ends of the causeway and where the Holy Island road leaves the A1 Great North Road at Beal. The causeway is generally open from about 3 hours after high tide until 2 hours before the next high tide, but the period of closure may be extended during stormy weather. Tide tables giving the safe crossing periods are published by Northumberland County council.

Despite these warnings, about one vehicle each month is stranded on the causeway, requiring rescue by, HM Coastguard, SeahousesRoyal National Lifeboat Institution lifeboat or RAF helicopter. A sea rescue costs approximately £1,900, while an air rescue costs more than £4,000. Locals have opposed a causeway barrier primarily on convenience grounds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above is the RAF rescue helicopter  which serves as the emergency service for island emergencies when the island is cut off from the mainland. This is he only way to get someone to hospital or if some one is trapped on the causeway either by car or on foot. It is a total of three miles across the causeway from the mainland.

 

Despite these warnings, about one vehicle each month is stranded on the causeway, requiring rescue by, HM Coastguard, SeahousesRoyal National Lifeboat Institution lifeboat or RAF helicopter. A sea rescue costs approximately £1,900, while an air rescue costs more than £4,000. Locals have opposed a causeway barrier primarily on convenience grounds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statue of St. Aidan in the churchyard grounds of St. Mary's church.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bamburgh Castle looking from Holy Island

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above and below views of the remains of the sandstone priory on Holy Island

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tidal Sand bank between the mainland and Holy Island

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bamburgh castle situated on the mainland coast a few miles south of Holy Island.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The harbour at Seahouses . The Farne Islands are just visible out to the left horizon of the picture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildlife just off Seahouses harbour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A local cottage that I used in 2014,  just off the causeway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Holy Island of Lindisfarne is a tidal island off the northeast coast of England. It is also known just as Holy Island. It constitutes the civil parish of Holy Island in Northumberland.[2]

 Holy Island has a recorded history from the 6th century. It was an important centre of Celtic Christianity under Saints Aidan, Cuthbert, Eadfrith and Eadberht.

After Viking invasions and the Norman conquest of England a priory was reestablished. A small castle was built upon it in 1550.

 

 

Lindisfarne Castle is a 16th-century castle located on Holy Island, near Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England, much altered by Sir Edwin Lutyens in 1901.

 The island is accessible from the mainland at low tide by means of a causeway.

The causeway.

Warning signs urge visitors walking to the island to keep to the marked path, check tide times and weather carefully, and to seek local advice if in doubt.

For drivers, tide tables are prominently displayed at both ends of the causeway and where the Holy Island road leaves the A1 Great North Road at Beal.

The causeway is generally open from about 3 hours after high tide until 2 hours before the next high tide, but the period of closure may be extended

 during stormy weather. Tide tables giving the safe crossing periods are published by Northumberland County council.

Despite these warnings, about one vehicle each month is stranded on the causeway, requiring rescue by, HM Coastguard, SeahousesRoyal National Lifeboat Institution lifeboat or RAF helicopter.

A sea rescue costs approximately £1,900, while an air rescue costs more than £4,000. Locals have opposed a causeway barrier primarily on convenience grounds.

 

 

The monastery

The monastery of Lindisfarne was founded by Irish monk Saint Aidan, who had been sent from Iona off the west coast of Scotland to Northumbria at the request of King Oswald.

The priory was founded before the end of 634 and Aidan remained there until his death in 651. The priory remained the only seat of a bishopric in Northumbria for nearly thirty years. 

Finian (bishop 651–661) built a timber church "suitable for a bishop's seat". St. Bede however was critical of the fact that the church was not built of stone but only of hewn oak thatched with reeds.

A later bishop, Eadbert removed the thatch and covered both walls and roof in lead. An abbot, who could be the bishop, was by elected by the brethren and led the community.

 

Lindisfarne Gospels

At some point in the early 700s the famous illuminated manuscript known as the Lindisfarne Gospels, an illustrated Latin copy of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John,

was made probably at Lindisfarne and the artist was possibly Eadfrith, who later became Bishop of Lindisfarne. Sometime in the second half of the 10th century a monk named Aldred added an Anglo-Saxon (Old English) gloss to the Latin text, producing the earliest surviving Old English copies of the Gospels. Aldred attributed the original to Eadfrith (bishop 698–721).

The Gospels were written with a good hand, but it is the illustrations done in an insular style containing a fusion of Celtic, Germanic and Roman elements that are truly outstanding.

According to Aldred, Eadfrith's successor Æthelwald was responsible for pressing and binding it and then it was covered with a fine metal case made by a hermit called Billfrith.[

] The Lindisfarne Gospels now reside in the British Library in London, somewhat to the annoyance of some Northumbrians.

In 1971 professor Suzanne Kaufman of Rockford, Illinois presented a facsimile copy of the Gospels to the clergy of the island.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use the Page Menu to Negotiate the Pages of this web site 

 

 This website contains a varied collection of photographic images by Barry Miller

More information about the images can be obtained by clicking on some of the photograpghs concerned.

 

 

Email  barrymillerphotography@yahoo.co.uk

If you are interested in a particular image and would like a print or digital copy of that image then please contact me.

Images have been taken on a Nikon DSLR using a 12 megapixel camera,

or alternatively a Fuji, modern  digital bridge camera, using  6 x megapixels, occasionlly increasing the megapixels to 12.3

 by using internal camera software.

A Fuji DSLR 12 megapixel camera is also used.

The majority are 12 megapixel jpg Nikon Images.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.cancerresearch.com/

Click the banner below to go to the cancer research web site

 

            http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/?utm_source=yahooPPC&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=brand_standard&utm_term=canser_research                

                        

GO TO PAGE MENU

                 or                              

 

 

 

           

END OF HOME PAGE USE THE MENU BAR FOR OTHER PAGES

      

 

To Perform a Monitor calibration click here